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Brainy Apples: Grading vs. Noticing
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Grading vs. Noticing

My post today is going to be about something that hit me several years ago, and it is very timely because these days schools are hounded about assessments, teachers are hounded about assessments, students are hounded about assessments, and parents are hounded about assessments. I agree that we over-assess our students, but I do feel that assessments have a special place in the classroom. Used the right way, assessments can allow teachers to see what students are or are not understanding……but only if we take the time to NOTICE.

When I began my teaching career, I would tote home loads of papers to grade. Grade, grade, grade. My time away from the classroom was not spent doing things I wanted to do because I had ALL.THESE.PAPERS.TO.GRADE. What was I grading? Daily work, homework, tests, quizzes. Then after I graded the papers, I would record the grade (back then it was numerical, now it is either a 1, 2, 3, or 4…which a 4 means perfect. Something I have  huge beef with, but that's for another post…I mean, who is perfect? I have mastered subtraction with regrouping, but I still make errors in my checkbook. So does that mean I shouldn't earn a 4?) Anyways, I record the grade, sent the papers home, students returned them, and I stuck them in their portfolios. I did look at the grades. I saw who had failed, who barely passed, and who obviously didn't need to spend anymore time on that skill. And I used the grades to make small groups: those who needed a lot of help, those who needed some help, and those who could learn new skills.

Flash forward a few years, and I was in my master's program taking an assessment course. And in this course, the professor said why give your students a whole page of addition with regrouping to see if they know how to do it? Give them 5 problems. That is enough to see if they have learned it. And as I thought back, I felt so dumb. Why didn't I realize that myself? Probably because my schooling had consisted of a whole page of addition with regrouping problems as a test. And some teachers say, "Well, if you only give 5 problems, it will be hard for them to make an A if they miss one. They need more problems so they can make a couple of mistakes and still get a higher grade." GRADE. Assessments shouldn't be for grades, they should be for understanding what a student doesn't get. They should be for figuring out the mistakes a student is making. I began to realize that I needed to take the time to NOTICE my students' work, NOTICE my students' thinking, NOTICE what they can and can't do. And, for those students who don't know how to add with regrouping, they are getting an entire page of problems that they will do wrong, and it will just further cement the wrong way in their minds, making a much harder habit to break and replace with a correct method (notice how I said A a correct method and not THE correct method….many ways to solve math problems besides using the standard algorithm). And for those students who already know how to do it, how bored out of their minds are they going to be to do an entire page of problems they already know how to do? Talk about busy work.

I vowed from that moment on to change the way I assess. Now some assessments you can't change, no matter how much you want. But you do have control over the assessments you create and give your students. Namely those formative assessments. Those quick checks to see if a student gets it or not, to see if they are ready to move on to a harder skill or if they need reteaching. My quick checks (as I called them) were going to be just that: quick.

Let's look at the difference between grading and noticing. Grade each row of problems. How did this student do?

1st row- Zero correct. Now notice what this student did. Quickly we go from thinking that this student can't add to realizing this student knows basic facts, but does not understand place value when adding.

2nd row- Two correct. Not too bad, but still failing. Now notice what this student did. We realize that this student knows basic facts including those that require regrouping as indicated by getting 17-9 = 8 correct, but this students doesn't understand how to extend using place value to subtract larger numbers.

3rd row- Two correct. Again, not great but not horrible. Now notice what this student did. This one may be a little trickier. If you teach a grade when student begin to learn multiplication, you probably know exactly what this student is doing. If we grade this row, we will think that the student needs more practice with subtraction and addition. But if we notice, we see that we just need to spend a few extra minutes with this students to straighten out the difference between adding and subtracting with zero versus multiplying with zero. This student has generalized the zero property of multiplication with addition and subtraction. Reteaching this student addition and subtraction would do him no good. However, doing a quick lesson or reminder about how adding or subtracting with zero does not equal zero would be a far better use of time.

When I finally began noticing my students' quick checks and not just grading them, I became a much more effective teacher, and my students began to progress and excel like they never had before. Why? Because I was noticing their errors. Instead of looking to see if they got it right, I began looking to see if they got it wrong, and, more importantly, WHY they got it wrong. I began noticing and stopped grading. I began giving no more than 4-5 problems during a quick check. Four or five problems is plenty to see a pattern in errors or to make sure they understand. I didn't spend time reteaching a skill when they didn't need reteaching. Sometimes all they needed was a quick one-on-one meeting with me to discuss their mistake.

What do you think about noticing versus grading? I would love to hear your thoughts and stories!


Until next time!


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14 comments:

  1. We don't really grade in Scotland and these errors are ALWAYS things that are noticed and pointed out to the pupil in the way of indicating it in their jotter, brief comments on the page and a quick chat/ group workshop if it is a common error needing addressed in the class. Thanks for sharing your thoughts! :-)

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    1. Clair, thank you for sharing your thoughts and how you address student errors.It is amazing how much more we as teachers can learn about our students' knowledge when we engage them in a discussion and listen and notice :)

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  2. I'm a second year teacher teaching 3rd grade, and I found this post VERY helpful!! I love these ideas and believe this will save me a lot of time in the New Year! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. You are so welcome! I wish I had this mindset years ago! It would have saved me from assigning lengthy assignments to my students, and then spend hours grading them, only to find out they still scored poorly on the next assignment. I also use anecdotal notes, too, using sticky notes stuck onto a clipboard while students are working. Totally old school stickies, but so helpful to have them at my fingertips for parent conversations!

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  3. I have been thinking along these very same lines. My only question is do you ever give larger tests? I am going to start using a 2-6 question check check on each math standard. However, we are still grade based and not standards based. I am already cutting out spelling, so I can imagine if I threw out tests as well I would have a parent revolt....

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    1. I feel the same way! We are stuck in between this type of thinking, but also needing *grades*. For now, I do the quick checks, but adjust the grade. So if there were 5 questions, and two were wrong, I would likely make it a 70% instead of a 60%. The point for me is getting information to use and knowing the child needs help. I'm sure it's not perfect, but it is working well enough for me right now! :)

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    2. Great question! I do give larger tests, but only after I feel like I have given enough formative assessments (quick checks) to address the inconsistencies in my students' learning. I don't give a lot of larger tests because I feel like if they are getting the smaller quick checks right, and they take a larger test and score well, then clearly they have mastered the standard. I don't need to keep testing them over it. I do, however, work in a spiral review to keep the skill fresh in their minds :)

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  4. I really enjoyed reading this post! So insightful. Assessment FOR learning (formative assessment) is the most important type of assessment, in my opinion! Thank you for sharing your thoughts! :)
    -Emily

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    1. You are welcome, Emily! This topic is one that is near and dear to my heart, and I am glad you found benefit in it!

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  5. Fantastic post, girl! Love calling it Noticing instead of Grading!!!!

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  6. Thanks for this! I've been a huge believer of this but never really put it into words. I would always procrastinate and put in my grades the night they were due, but I could just about type in their actual grades wihtout even scoring anything, because I knew within a couple of points where my students' scores would be. If you are having good conversations with your students, you don't need a score to tell you if they mastered something or not.

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    1. You are exactly right! When we spend time noticing our students' work on a daily basis, we know exactly where they are. Conversations can be so telling about a students' mastery.

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  7. Great post! This is something teachers should do every day. I always check math HW with my students and walk around to see how everyone did. That way, I can quickly adjust my lesson based on what they showed they did and didn't understand. This week, I noticed that only one student confused numerators and denominators, so that was a quick fix by both his math partner and me.

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    1. It is usually easy to correct simple mistakes when you find them right away, and not waiting after a student has been practicing the wrong method for a while. Taking time to notice clues you in right away with how a student is doing. Formative assessment at its finest!

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